5 Predictions On How Software Engineering Will Change in 2024

ISVs that embrace these five trends will be well-positioned for success in the years to come.

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The last decade ushered in several pivotal transformations in software development propelled by technological innovation, evolving user expectations, and a rapidly changing business environment. The widespread adoption of cloud computing, the rise of DevOps practices and now AI within software development all revolutionized the way software is built, deployed, and managed, and reshaped the way the modern world works. Now, we stand on the cusp of another spike in the efficiency and impact of software development. Here are crucial trends we can expect in 2024 and beyond.

Resource allocation will fall back in the hands of elite engineering leaders

We’ve likely all heard the phrase “the CFO is the new CIO” during tough economic times. Unfortunately, over the last year, we saw many engineering leaders struggle to justify their requested investments as CFOs took control of resource decisions for the engineering function. In 2024, I expect a lightbulb will turn on for more engineering leaders regarding taking control of the investment allocation data so they can be successful counterparts in this discussion and push back where needed. We’ll see strong engineering leaders take control of the narrative by using data to justify their resource asks and mapping their team’s impact to the business’s bottom line.

Engineering success will be team-centered

In 2024, the focus of engineering success will shift from individual developer productivity to team-level engineering efficiency. For years, engineering leaders have recognized that individual developer productivity metrics can hurt the culture and lead to undesired results for team improvement initiatives. The challenge was how to explain this to the rest of the business. This year, leaders will address this issue decisively by focusing on engineering efficiency as the primary measure of success.

Engineering efficiency tools will take center stage

The challenging macroeconomic times will drive advanced engineering efficiency and metrics tools in 2024. We’ll also see fewer companies attempt a DIY solution because new, innovative tools will outpace the sophistication engineering leaders can muster themselves.

The narrow development pipelines will be revamped to support GenAI

The promise of GenAI for coding won’t be fully realized until organizations invest in infrastructure work on their development pipeline. Smart companies will focus on classifying code changes, automating the code approval and merge process, hiring senior developers to inspect the code, making smart decisions on CI workloads, and adopting conditional CD. 2024 will be the year that leading businesses make these adjustments and start investing in software pipeline automation so the influx of code assisted by GenAI can stream through their development pipeline seamlessly.

Developer experience teams will change the recruiting game

We’ll see developer experience (DX) operationalized in the coming year as forward-thinking businesses create DX teams. Similar to customer experience teams, the DX experts will analyze developers’ paths to success from both a quantitative and qualitative view. They’ll review and analyze metrics like merge frequency, CI run times, and flaky tests while collaborating with developers themselves to pinpoint workflow barriers and bottlenecks to success via surveys. Businesses prioritizing these teams in 2024 will begin to pull top developer talent.

The software development industry is poised for a significant surge in 2024. Engineering leaders will regain control of resource allocation, efficiency will take center stage, GenAI will force innovation, and new teams will transform the development experience. Businesses that embrace these trends will be well-positioned for success in the years to come.

Ori Keren

Ori Keren is co-founder and CEO at LinearB. Ori’s first programming experience was running Basic on a Sinclair Spectrum ZX 48k in 1987, and he got his first developer job in 2000. Prior to starting LinearB, Ori was VP of R&D at CloudLock (acquired by Cisco). Prior to joining CloudLock, Ori managed an engineering group at Interwise (acquired by AT&T). With more than 15 years of management experience, Ori is on a mission to help engineering teams to become data-driven and accelerate delivery.


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Ori Keren

Ori Keren is co-founder and CEO at LinearB. Ori’s first programming experience was running Basic on a Sinclair Spectrum ZX 48k in 1987, and he got his first developer job in 2000. Prior to starting LinearB, Ori was VP of R&D at CloudLock (acquired by Cisco). Prior to joining CloudLock, Ori managed an engineering group at Interwise (acquired by AT&T). With more than 15 years of management experience, Ori is on a mission to help engineering teams to become data-driven and accelerate delivery.